Alex Bregman featured on ironic catalog cover after Astros cheating scandal

Local Sports

NEW MEXICO (KRQE) – At the start of spring training in Florida, the Houston Astros and Alex Bregman, publicly apologized for the team’s cheating scandal on Thursday.

“I am really sorry about the choices that were made by my team, by the organization and by me,” Bregman says. Now Bregman is getting slammed again, taking a hit for a catalog cover touting his hard work.

“It’s a disgrace, it really is a disgrace to baseball. It doesn’t look good on them it doesn’t look good on the sport,” Joshua Salazar.

For a lot of fans, the Astros should have an asterisk next to their 2017 world series title as details of their sign-stealing operation have surfaced.

So many sports fans were surprised to see the third baseman on the cover of sports apparel and equipment catalog Eastbay and the phrase next to his photo, “Always earned, never given.”

Definitely too soon to put a magazine cover of Alex Bregman,” Salazar says.
“I just wish that he would be held responsible they need to hold these players responsible for their actions,” says Jordan Robinson.

The poorly timed catalog cover has gotten a lot of attention on Twitter, one user calling it a “Garbage cover.” Another tweet saying, “Eastbay needs to find another marketing director.”

Fans says they aren’t questioning Bregman’s work ethic. just his character. “He made it to the league but once he made it there he did cheat and cheaters never prosper,” Salazar says.

Despite calls to punish the players for cheating, the commissioner decided otherwise. Thursday, the Astros’ owner backed that decision, saying coaches and management are to blame because they didn’t stop the cheating.

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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