Photos: Japan marks 75th anniversary of atomic bombing at Hiroshima

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WORLD (KRQE) – Survivors of the world’s first atomic bombing have gathered in Hiroshima, Japan to mark its 75th anniversary. 

People burn joss sticks in front of the cenotaph for the atomic bombing victims before the start of a ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the U.S. bombing in Hiroshima, western Japan, early Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
People pray in front of the cenotaph for the atomic bombing victims before the start of a ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the U.S. bombing in Hiroshima, western Japan, early Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows in front of Hiroshima Memorial Cenotaph during a ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the bombing at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in Hiroshima, western Japan. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
Kazumi Matsui, right, mayor of Hiroshima, and the family of the deceased bow before they place the victims list of the Atomic Bomb at Hiroshima Memorial Cenotaph during the ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the bombing at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in Hiroshima, western Japan. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
Participants gather at Hiroshima Memorial Cenotaph during the ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the bombing at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
The family of the deceased offer flowers to Hiroshima Memorial Cenotaph during the ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the bombing at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in Hiroshima, western Japan. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
The No. 653 tram, which survived the atomic bomb, runs along the street near the Atomic Bomb Dome to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the U.S. first atomic bombing on the city in Hiroshima, Japan, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
Visitors observe a minute of silence for the victims of the atomic bombing, at 8:15am, the time atomic bomb exploded over the city, at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park during the ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the bombing Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in Hiroshima, western Japan. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
Visitors observe a minute of silence for the victims of the atomic bombing, at 8:15am, the time atomic bomb exploded over the city, at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park during the ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the bombing Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in Hiroshima, western Japan. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
A man prays in front of the cenotaph for the atomic bombing victims before the start of ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the bombing in Hiroshima, western Japan, early Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
FILE – In this Aug. 6, 1945, file photo, smoke rises 20,000 feet above Hiroshima, western Japan, after the first atomic bomb was dropped during warfare. Hiroshima was targeted because it was a major Japanese military hub filled with military bases and ammunition facilities. The city of Hiroshima on Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the world’s first nuclear attack. (AP Photo, File)
FILE – In this Sept. 8, 1945, file photo, an allied correspondent stands in a sea of rubble before the shell of a building that once was a movie theater in Hiroshima, western Japan, a month after the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare was dropped by the U.S. to hasten Japan’s surrender. Many people exposed to radiation developed symptoms such as vomiting and hair loss. Most of those with severe radiation symptoms died within three to six weeks. Others who lived beyond that developed health problems related to burns and radiation-induced cancers and other illnesses. (AP Photo/Stanley Troutman, Pool, File)
FILE – In this Sept. 8, 1945, file photo released by U.S. Air Force, two people walk on a cleared path through the destruction resulting from the Aug. 6 detonation of the first atomic bomb in Hiroshima, Japan. An estimated 140,000 people, including those with radiation-related injuries and illnesses, died through Dec. 31, 1945. That was 40% of Hiroshima’s population of 350,000 before the attack. (U.S. Air Force via AP, File)
FILE – In this Sept. 5, 1945, file aerial photo, the landscape of Hiroshima, western Japan, shows widespread rubble and debris, one month after the atomic bomb was dropped. An estimated 140,000 people, including those with radiation-related injuries and illnesses, died through Dec. 31, 1945. That was 40% of Hiroshima’s population of 350,000 before the attack. (AP Photo/Max Desfor, File)
FILE – In this Sept. 7, 1945, file photo, an unidentified man stands next to a tiled fireplace where a house once stood in Hiroshima, western Japan. The Aug. 6, 1945, bombing was the world’s first nuclear attack. An estimated 140,000 people, including those with radiation-related injuries and illnesses, died through Dec. 31, 1945. That was 40% of Hiroshima’s population of 350,000 before the attack. (AP Photo/Stanley Troutman, Pool, File)
FILE – This Aug. 6, 1945, file photo released by the U.S. Air Force shows the total destruction of Hiroshima, western Japan, as the result of the first atomic bomb dropped. An estimated 140,000 people, including those with radiation-related injuries and illnesses, died through Dec. 31, 1945. That was 40% of Hiroshima’s population of 350,000 before the attack. (U.S. Air Force via AP, File)
FILE – In this Aug 8, 1945, photo, soldiers and civilians walk through the grim remains of Hiroshima, western Japan, two days after the atomic bomb explosion. The building on left with columned facade was the Hiroshima Bank. To its right, with arched front entrance, was the Sumitomo Bank. An estimated 140,000 people, including those with radiation-related injuries and illnesses, died through Dec. 31, 1945. That was 40% of Hiroshima’s population of 350,000 before the attack. (AP Photo, File)
FILE – In this Aug. 6, 1945, file photo, survivors are seen as they receive emergency treatment by military medics shortly after the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare was dropped by the United States over Hiroshima, western Japan. Many people exposed to radiation developed symptoms such as vomiting and hair loss. Most of those with severe radiation symptoms died within three to six weeks. Others who lived beyond that developed health problems related to burns and radiation-induced cancers and other illnesses. (AP Photo, File)
FILE – In this Aug. 6, 1945, file photo released by US Air Force, a column of smoke rises 20,000 feet over Hiroshima, western Japan, after the first atomic 5-ton “Little Boy” bomb was released. Hiroshima was targeted because it was a major Japanese military hub filled with military bases and ammunition facilities. The city of Hiroshima on Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the world’s first nuclear attack. (George R. Caron/US Air Force via AP, File)
FILE – In this Aug. 6, 1945, file photo released by the U.S. Air Force, white smoke rises from detonation of the atomic bomb over Hiroshima, western Japan. At 8:15 a.m., the U.S. B-29 bomber Enola Gay dropped the 4-ton “Little Boy” uranium bomb from a height of 9,600 meters (31,500 feet) on the city center, targeting the Aioi Bridge. The bomb exploded 43 seconds later, 600 meters (2,000 feet) above the ground. (U.S. Air Force via AP, File)
Picture dated 1948 showing the devastated city of Hiroshima after the US nuclear bombing on the city 06 August 1946 during World War II. This file photo dated 1948 shows the devastated city of Hiroshima some three years after the US dropped an atomic bomb on the city, 06 August 1945, at the end of World War II. Around 140,000 people, or more than half of Hiroshima’s population at the time, died in the first atomic bombing 06 August 1945, with another 70,000 people perishing in the bomb dropped over Nagasaki 09 August 1945. Following the bombings, Japan surrendered 02 September 1945 to Allied forces, officially ending World War II, bringing down the curtain on the costliest conflict in history. The 60th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima will take place with ceremonies in the Japanese city on 06 August 2005. AFP PHOTO/FILES AFP/FILES (Photo by STF / AFP) (Photo by STF/AFP via Getty Images)
A woman carries a baby past a new block of flats in Hiroshima, Japan, circa 1955. Virtually all the city’s old housing was destroyed in the atomic bomb attack of 1945. (Photo by Three Lions/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
HIROSHIMA, JAPAN: END OF THE WAR/HIROSHIMA PHOTO PACKAGE (FILES) This file photo dated 1945 shows the devastated city of Hiroshima in days after the first atomic bomb was dropped by a US Air Force B-29, 06 August 1945. Around 140,000 people, or more than half of Hiroshima’s population at the time, died in the first atomic bombing 06 August 1945, with another 70,000 people perishing in the bomb dropped over Nagasaki 09 August 1945. Following the bombings, Japan surrendered 02 September 1945 to Allied forces, officially ending World War II, bringing down the curtain on the costliest conflict in history. The 60th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima will take place with ceremonies in the Japanese city on 06 August 2005. AFP PHOTO/HO/FILES (Photo credit should read AFP/AFP via Getty Images)
March 1946: New homes are built in Hiroshima to replace those destroyed by the atomic bomb dropped on the city on the 6th August 1945. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
1946: Wreckage of buildings in Hiroshima after the dropping of the atomic bomb (6th August 1945). (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
6th August 1945: The twisted wreckage of a theatre, located 800 metres from the epicentre of the atomic explosion at Hiroshima. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
August 1946: A view of Hiroshima one year after being the target for the first atomic bomb. It was estimated that between six and ten thousand corpses still lay under the ruins of the city that was sixty per cent destroyed by the atomic blast. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
1945: Atomic bomb damage in Hiroshima. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
1945: Atomic bomb damage at Hiroshima with a burnt out fire engine amidst the rubble. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
High-angle view of a section of the city of Hiroshima after the US atomic bombing on August 6, 1945. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
An atomic bomb of the type nicknamed “Little Boy” that was dropped by a US Army Air Force B-29 bomber on August 9, 1945 over Hiroshima, Japan, is seen in this undated file photo released by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. (Photo by – / LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY / AFP) (Photo by -/LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY/AFP via Getty Images)
Hiroshima after the atom bomb explosion. (Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images)
An aerial view of Hiroshima showing the devastation caused by a single atomic bomb dropped on the city on August 6th 1945. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
6th August 1945: This aerial view of Hiroshima after the dropping of the first atomic bomb shows the total destruction and devastation caused. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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