PHOTOS: Coronavirus dims Mexico’s bright Día de los Muertos celebration

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MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico’s Día de los Muertos celebration this weekend won’t be the same in a year so marked by death after more than 90,000 people have died of COVID-19. Many of those victims had to be cremated rather than buried, and even for those with gravesides to visit, the pandemic has forced authorities in most parts of Mexico to close cemeteries to prevent traditional visits. Usually, entire families gather to clean and decorate tombs and cover them with orange marigold flowers, light candles and chat with their deceased relatives, perhaps over a glass of their favorite beverage.

Cemetery worker Jorge Arvizu, left, helps a family member place a plaque on the grave of Vicente Dominguez who died of complications related to the new coronavirus, at the municipal cemetery Valle de Chalco, on the outskirts of Mexico City, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020. Mexican families traditionally flock to local cemeteries to honor their dead relatives as part of the “Dia de los Muertos,” or Day of the Dead celebrations, but according to authorities the cemeteries will be closed this year to help curb the spread of COVID-19. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
Customers, wearing protective face masks amid the new cornavirus pandemic, shop for flowers at the Jamaica Market, in Mexico City, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020. Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebration this weekend won’t be the same in a year so marked by death, in a country where more than 90,000 people have died of COVID-19. Many of those had to be cremated rather than buried, and even for those with gravesides to visit, the pandemic has forced authorities in most parts of Mexico to close cemeteries to prevent the traditional Nov. 1-2 observances when entire families clean and decorate tombs. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)
Graves are decorated with crosses and grass in a section of the municipal cemetery Valle de Chalco amid the new coronavirus pandemic, on the outskirts of Mexico City, Sunday, Oct. 25, 2020. Mexican families traditionally flock to local cemeteries to honor their dead relatives as part of the “Dia de los Muertos,” or Day of the Dead celebrations, but according to authorities the cemeteries will be closed this year to help curb the spread of COVID-19. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
A musician walks through the municipal cemetery Valle de Chalco amid the new coronavirus pandemic, on the outskirts of Mexico City, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020. Mexican families traditionally flock to local cemeteries to honor their dead relatives as part of the “Dia de los Muertos,” or Day of the Dead celebrations, but according to authorities the cemeteries will be closed this year to help curb the spread of COVID-19. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
Day of the Dead chocolate skulls are displayed for sale at the Jamaica Market, in Mexico City, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020. Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebration this weekend won’t be the same in a year so marked by death, in a country where more than 90,000 people have died of COVID-19. Many of those had to be cremated rather than buried, and even for those with gravesides to visit, the pandemic has forced authorities in most parts of Mexico to close cemeteries to prevent the traditional Nov. 1-2 observances when entire families clean and decorate tombs. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)
Cemetery worker Jorge Arvizu plants a rose bush on a grave at the municipal cemetery Valle de Chalco amid the new coronavirus pandemic, on the outskirts of Mexico City, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020. Mexican families traditionally flock to local cemeteries to honor their dead relatives as part of the “Dia de los Muertos,” or Day of the Dead celebrations, but according to authorities the cemeteries will be closed this year to help curb the spread of COVID-19. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
Relatives bury Isaac Nolasco who died of reasons not believed related to COVID-19, in a section of the municipal cemetery Valle de Chalco amid the new coronavirus pandemic, on the outskirts of Mexico City, Sunday, Oct. 25, 2020. Mexican families traditionally flock to local cemeteries to honor their dead relatives as part of the “Dia de los Muertos,” or Day of the Dead celebrations, but according to authorities, the cemeteries will be closed this year to help curb the spread of COVID-19. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
A flower vendor holds up his arms to catch a bouquet of marigolds, the iconic Day of the Dead flower for Mexicans that is known as cempasuchil, at the Jamaica Market, in Mexico City, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020. Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebration this weekend won’t be the same in a year so marked by death, in a country where more than 90,000 people have died of COVID-19. Many of those had to be cremated rather than buried, and even for those with gravesides to visit, the pandemic has forced authorities in most parts of Mexico to close cemeteries to prevent the traditional Nov. 1-2 observances when entire families clean and decorate tombs. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)
A cemetery worker digs a grave at the municipal cemetery Valle de Chalco amid the new coronavirus pandemic, on the outskirts of Mexico City, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020. Mexican families traditionally flock to local cemeteries to honor their dead relatives as part of the “Dia de los Muertos,” or Day of the Dead celebrations, but according to authorities the cemeteries will be closed this year to help curb the spread of COVID-19. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
Mexican wrestler Mister Jerry floats with a boatful of marigold flowers in the famous floating gardens of Xochimilco, on the outskirts of Mexico City, Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020. The harvest of Mexican marigold flowers known as Cempasuchil in the Nahuatl language is done ahead of the Nov. 1, Day Of The Dead holiday. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
Women dressed as “Catrinas” perform in a play promoting the upcoming Day of the Dead holiday, in the Xochimilco borough of Mexico City, Friday, Oct. 23, 2020. The iconic figures of skeletons with elegant wide-brimmed hats better known as Catrinas were created as satirical prints by Mexican artist Jose Guadalupe Posada sometime between 1910 and his death in 1913. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
People cast the light of their cellphones from their trajinera boats as they watch the play La Llorona performed on top of a chinampa, a small artificial island at Cuemanco pier in Xochimilco, Mexico City, late Friday, Oct. 9, 2020, as the city promotes the upcoming Day of the Dead holiday at the end of the month, amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Legend has it that La Llorona drowned her children and then regretfully looks for them in rivers and towns, scaring locals who can hear her at night. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
Gabriela Ruiz is dressed as a “Catrina” to perform in a play promoting the upcoming Day of the Dead holiday, at the Nativita pier in the Xochimilco borough of Mexico City, Friday, Oct. 23, 2020. The iconic figures of skeletons with elegant wide-brimmed hats better known as Catrinas were created as satirical prints by Mexican artist Jose Guadalupe Posada sometime between 1910 and his death in 1913. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
Actress Nayeli Cortes dressed as the La Llorona character, carries a doll representing her child as she performs in the play La Llorona on top of a chinampa, a small artificial island at Cuemanco pier in Xochimilco, Mexico City, late Friday, Oct. 9, 2020, as the city promotes the upcoming Day of the Dead holiday at the end of the month, amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Legend has it that La Llorona drowned her children and then regretfully looks for them in rivers and towns, scaring locals who can hear her at night. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
A young flower vendor holds a bouquet of marigolds, the iconic Day of the Dead flower for Mexicans that is known as cempasuchil, at the Jamaica Market, in Mexico City, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020. Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebration this weekend won’t be the same in a year so marked by death, in a country where more than 90,000 people have died of COVID-19. Many of those had to be cremated rather than buried, and even for those with gravesides to visit, the pandemic has forced authorities in most parts of Mexico to close cemeteries to prevent the traditional Nov. 1-2 observances when entire families clean and decorate tombs. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)
Vendors stand atop truckloads of marigolds and cockscomb flowers as they wait for customers looking to but flowers for the upcoming Day of the Dead holiday, at the Jamaica Market, in Mexico City, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020. Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebration this weekend won’t be the same in a year so marked by death, in a country where more than 90,000 people have died of COVID-19. Many of those had to be cremated rather than buried, and even for those with gravesides to visit, the pandemic has forced authorities in most parts of Mexico to close cemeteries to prevent the traditional Nov. 1-2 observances when entire families clean and decorate tombs. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)
Customers, wearing protective face masks amid the new cornavirus pandemic, shop for flowers at the Jamaica Market, in Mexico City, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020. Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebration this weekend won’t be the same in a year so marked by death, in a country where more than 90,000 people have died of COVID-19. Many of those had to be cremated rather than buried, and even for those with gravesides to visit, the pandemic has forced authorities in most parts of Mexico to close cemeteries to prevent the traditional Nov. 1-2 observances when entire families clean and decorate tombs. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)
A flower vendor tosses a bouquet of marigolds, the iconic Day of the Dead flower for Mexicans that is known as cempasuchil, at the Jamaica Market, in Mexico City, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020. Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebration this weekend won’t be the same in a year so marked by death, in a country where more than 90,000 people have died of COVID-19. Many of those had to be cremated rather than buried, and even for those with gravesides to visit, the pandemic has forced authorities in most parts of Mexico to close cemeteries to prevent the traditional Nov. 1-2 observances when entire families clean and decorate tombs. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)
Day of the Dead skulls are displayed for sale at the Jamaica Market, in Mexico City, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020. Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebration this weekend won’t be the same in a year so marked by death, in a country where more than 90,000 people have died of COVID-19. Many of those had to be cremated rather than buried, and even for those with gravesides to visit, the pandemic has forced authorities in most parts of Mexico to close cemeteries to prevent the traditional Nov. 1-2 observances when entire families clean and decorate tombs. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

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