PHOTOS: Australia’s deadly wildfires from space

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On January 9, 2020, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired natural-color observations of burned land and thick smoke covering Australia’s Kangaroo Island.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – Satellites have captured images of Australia’s horrific wildfires.

On January 9, 2020, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired natural-color observations of burned land and thick smoke covering Australia’s Kangaroo Island. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Lauren Dauphin, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Caption by Mike Carlowicz.
On January 9, 2020, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired natural-color observations of burned land and thick smoke covering Australia’s Kangaroo Island. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Lauren Dauphin, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Caption by Mike Carlowicz.
The photograph above from the International Space Station shows extreme fire activity on January 4, 2020. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Joshua Stevens, using data from the CALIPSO team, and VIIRS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership. Story by Adam Voiland.
On January 4, 2020, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite, acquired the photo above. Smoke has a tan color, while clouds are bright white. It is likely that some of the white patches above the smoke are pyrocumulonimbus clouds—clouds created by the convection and heat rising from a fire. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview.
Australia wildfires captured on January 1, 2020, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite. The smoke has a tan color, while clouds are bright white. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Joshua Stevens, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey and MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview.
Australia wildfires captured by Terra satellite on December 17, 2019. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Joshua Stevens and Lauren Dauphin
Image of the fires near the coast of New South Wales, near Canberra and areas north to the border with Queensland. The image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite on December 9, 2019. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Joshua Stevens and Lauren Dauphin
The fires are visible in this image, acquired at 2:45 p.m. local time on December 4, 2019, by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP satellite. The fires burned near the coast of New South Wales, near Canberra and areas north to the border with Queensland. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Lauren Dauphin, using VIIRS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview, and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership
On November 19, 2019, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired a natural-color image (above) of thick smoke plumes rising from New South Wales (NSW) and Queensland. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images and video by Joshua Stevens, using GEOS-5 data from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office at NASA GSFC, MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview, and Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey
On November 17, the Operational Land Imager on Landsat 8 acquired this nighttime image of fires raging near Port Macquarie, New South Wales. The image was made from a combination of shortwave and near-infrared data (bands 7-6-5) to reveal hot spots through the smoke and clouds. The infrared data is overlaid on a base map created with imagery from before the fires began. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Joshua Stevens, using GEOS-5 data from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office at NASA GSFC, MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview, and Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey
On November 9, 2019, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP satellite got a daytime view of the fires raging in Queensland and New South Wales. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using VIIRS day-night band data from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership and MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview. Story by Mike Carlowicz.
On November 9, 2019, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP satellite got a nighttime view of the fires raging in Queensland and New South Wales. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using VIIRS day-night band data from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership and MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview. Story by Mike Carlowicz.
On November 8, 2019, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP satellite captured images of the fires. The fires burned near the coast from north of Sydney to the border with Queensland, with thick smoke blowing southeast over the Tasman Sea. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Lauren Dauphin, using VIIRS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview, and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership.
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this image of the smoke plumes on November 7, 2019. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Lauren Dauphin, using MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview
On November 5, 2019, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired this natural-color image of fire and smoke in southern Western Australia. Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Lauren Dauphin, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey
On September 12, 2019, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired the natural-color image (above) of fires in the northeastern reaches of New South Wales. Strong westerly winds fanned the flames and carried smoke more than 100 kilometers (60 miles). Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Lauren Dauphin and Joshua Stevens, using MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview and soil moisture data courtesy of JPL and the SMAP Science Team.

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