PHOTOS: Apple sleuths hunt Northwest for varieties believed extinct

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In this Oct. 28, 2019, photo, amateur botanist David Benscoter, of The Lost Apple Project, holds a pole picker as he stands near an apple tree in an orchard in the Steptoe Butte area near Colfax, Wash. Benscoter and fellow botanist E.J. Brandt have rediscovered at least 13 long-lost apple varieties in homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho that had previously been thought to be extinct. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

In this Oct. 28, 2019, photo, amateur botanist David Benscoter, of The Lost Apple Project, stands near a tree in the Steptoe Butte area near Colfax, Wash., that produces Arkansas Beauty apples, a so-called heritage fruit long believed to be extinct until Benscoter and fellow botanist E.J. Brandt rediscovered it, along with at least 12 other long-lost apple varieties over the past several years through their work searching in homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Oct. 22, 2019, photo, E.J. Brandt and David Benscoter, amateur botanists with The Lost Apple Project, walk toward an orchard in the Steptoe Butte area near Colfax, Wash. Trees in the orchard are among hundreds currently being studied by the pair, who have rediscovered at least 13 long-lost apple varieties in homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho that had previously been thought to be extinct. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
In this Oct. 30, 2019, photo, Joanie Cooper, of the Temperate Orchard Conservancy, compares a rare apple to a 1908 watercolor illustration of the same variety in a U.S. Department of Agriculture book, as she works in her lab in Molalla, Oregon. The apple is a Rhode Island Greening, a heritage variety that was once popular but has now become extremely rare in the U.S. Cooper and her colleagues have helped identify many of the 13 “lost” apple varieties that have been rediscovered in recent years by the Lost Apple Project in eastern Washington and northern Idaho. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
In this Oct. 28, 2019, photo, amateur botanist David Benscoter, of The Lost Apple Project, picks an apple that may be of the Clarke variety in an orchard near Pullman, Wash. Benscoter and fellow botanist E.J. Brandt have rediscovered at least 13 long-lost apple varieties in homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho that had previously been thought to be extinct. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Oct. 30, 2019, photo, Joanie Cooper, of the Temperate Orchard Conservancy, uses a knife to cut the seed area of a rare apple in her lab in Molalla, Oregon. Cooper and her colleagues have helped identify many of the 13 “lost” apple varieties that have been rediscovered in recent years by the Lost Apple Project in eastern Washington and northern Idaho. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
In this Oct. 29, 2019, photo, amateur botanist E.J. Brandt, of The Lost Apple Project, examines an apple tree in an orchard on a homestead site near Kendrick, Idaho. Brandt and fellow botanist David Benscoter have rediscovered at least 13 long-lost apple varieties in homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho that had previously been thought to be extinct. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Oct. 29, 2019, photo, amateur botanist E.J. Brandt, of The Lost Apple Project, uses a pole picker to collect apples from a tree in an orchard near Moscow, Idaho. Brandt and fellow botanist David Benscoter have rediscovered at least 13 long-lost apple varieties in homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho that had previously been thought to be extinct. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Oct. 28, 2019, photo, amateur botanist David Benscoter, of The Lost Apple Project, holds a pole picker as he stands near an apple tree in an orchard in the Steptoe Butte area near Colfax, Wash. Benscoter and fellow botanist E.J. Brandt have rediscovered at least 13 long-lost apple varieties in homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho that had previously been thought to be extinct. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Oct. 28, 2019, photo, apples collected from an orchard at a remote homestead near Pullman, Wash., are shown next to detailed field notes made by David Benscoter, an amateur botanist with The Lost Apple Project, which has rediscovered at least 13 long-lost apple varieties in similar homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho that had previously been thought to be extinct. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Oct. 29, 2019, photo, amateur botanist E.J. Brandt, of The Lost Apple Project, examines apples he picked from a tree in an orchard near Troy, Idaho. Brandt and fellow botanist David Benscoter have rediscovered at least 13 long-lost apple varieties in homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho that had previously been thought to be extinct. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Oct. 28, 2019, photo, amateur botanist David Benscoter, of The Lost Apple Project, examines an apple as he works in an orchard near Pullman, Wash. Benscoter and fellow botanist E.J. Brandt have rediscovered at least 13 long-lost apple varieties in homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho that had previously been thought to be extinct. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Oct. 29, 2019, photo, amateur botanist E.J. Brandt, of The Lost Apple Project, bites into an apple he picked from a tree in an orchard near Troy, Idaho. Brandt and fellow botanist David Benscoter have rediscovered at least 13 long-lost apple varieties in homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho that had previously been thought to be extinct. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Oct. 28, 2019, photo, amateur botanist David Benscoter, of The Lost Apple Project, writes on a bag as he collects apples that may be of the Clarke variety in an orchard near Pullman, Wash. Benscoter and fellow botanist E.J. Brandt have rediscovered at least 13 long-lost apple varieties in homestead orchards, remote canyons and windswept fields in eastern Washington and northern Idaho that had previously been thought to be extinct. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

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