State looks to revamp I-25 corridor, south of the Big-I

News

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – The New Mexico Department of Transportation is looking to fix up one long stretch along I-25 that’s showing its age and its dangers.

It’s the corridor along I-25, nearly 10-miles long, from the Big-I to the Broadway exit.

The department has been studying the area since 2013 and the fix could come with an estimated $373 million price tag.

“We would select the projects in phases,” Spokesperson Bernadette Bell said. “These would be funded with federal and state dollars but we would never do this entire corridor all at once.”

The study looks at on-and-off ramps with the quick mergers, the heavy traffic, the crashes and the infamous “s-curve,” which drivers are very aware of.

“It’s enough to make you want to hold onto the steering wheel,” Joe Davis said. “That curve is pretty sharp and if the guy next to you wants to come into your lane and if you don’t watch what you’re doing you can lose it out there.”

The study shows it’s an area along the corridor prone to crashes.

DOT is studying ways to re-do the on and off-ramps at Lead and Coal and the interchange at Cesar Chavez. All that could take years before drivers see any type of construction. Until then, DOT is considering some ramp closures like the Coal ramp onto southbound I-25. The study also shows the department has plans to straighten out the “s-curve.”

The department has already held three community meetings. The next will be a public meeting: Thursday at 6 p.m. at the Herman Sanchez Community Center.

DOT said it hopes to have the study finished next month. Bell said no plans are set in stone as of now.

“It starts with the study then we design then we construct,” Bell said. “It could take years before we actually see any of these projects begin.”

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Now Trending on KRQE.com

Weather

More Video Forecast

Don't Miss

More Don't Miss