Man who shot Albuquerque officer sentenced to 17 years

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As you might imagine, the officer who was shot at is not happy.

Christopher Cook faced a life sentence Tuesday for being a felon with a gun the night he shot Officer Lou Golson.

Instead, he was sentenced to 17 years. Cook will serve it while he’s already serving his other 20-year sentence. 

Officer Golson did not get the outcome he wanted or expected. 

It was January 2015 when Officer Golson pulled Cook over in a stolen car for a DWI stop.

Within seconds Cook opened fire, hitting Golson in the stomach and leg.

Golson survived, but his injuries have left him unable to return to the force.

Cook later agreed to plead guilty to car theft, shooting from a vehicle and aggravated battery on a peace officer.

The attempted murder charge was dropped. 

Golson was good with the move. It avoided a trial and Cook got a 20 year sentence. 

Golson also knew Cook was facing a possible life sentence in federal court for being a felon with a gun.

Tuesday in federal court in Santa Fe, attorneys argued for hours about what sentence was appropriate. 

The U.S. Attorney’s Office argued Cook is an armed career criminal who deserved the max.

He’s been convicted of at least eleven felonies, including two involving attempted aggravated assaults on peace officers. 

However, Cook’s attorneys pointed out his abusive childhood.  They talked about how he started running away when he was 4 years old, his mental health issues and lack of family support. 

In the end Judge Martha Vasquez sympathized saying she believes he needs treatment, medication and not a life sentence.

Golson called it a pathetic sentence. 

“They’re allowed to prey on the community again and again and again. The judge even said you are dangerous but then gives him essentially a two year sentence,” said Officer Lou Golson.

“There’s a reason they keep offending because there are no punishments. There are no consequence to their actions.”

With good time and time served, Cook will have to spend an additional two years in prison.

He’ll serve all but those two years in state prison where he can have access to more mental health resources. 

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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