APD often uses social media when investigating crimes

It’s the day and age of people walking with their heads down and faces in their phones. 

“Social media is the trendsetter,” said Jordan Scott.

Scott, the social media manager at the University of New Mexico, said social media platforms aren’t going anywhere, especially with the younger generations. 

“That’s their way of communicating like this is what I’m doing, I want the world to see,” she said.  

For the Albuquerque Police Department, social media has become a big part of how they investigate. Just last month, a teen awaiting sentencing in a deadly car theft case was seen shooting guns and selling drugs on his Snapchat.

“I’ve been able to recruit a core group of detectives that are really savvy with social media,” said APD Lt. David Jaramilo.

In December, a mom used her missing son’s Snapchat to try and find him, after videos of him being tortured were circulating online. And the teen accused of killing a mailman was found hiding out at a home, through a post on his Instagram. 

“It feels like they believe they can get away with this type of post without any reprisal, without anybody seeing it there,” said Jaramillo.  

He oversees APD’s Narcotics team and said there’s one trend they’re seeing a lot of. 

“What we’ve seen lately is an emphasis, especially among younger drug dealers to start utilizing social media,” he said.  

APD works closely with the District Attorney’s Office sharing intel. 

“They have a lot of analysts, they have information on who some of the most prolific individuals that we want to get off the streets,” said Jaramillo. 

Lt. Jaramillo said when they get information that someone has committed a crime, law enforcement does have to get search warrants to gain access to private or blocked information. 
 

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