(STACKER) – According to the U.S. Census Bureau, of the more than 154 million Americans who commuted to work in 2021, just 616,153 did so by bike. If this figure seems both incredibly small and surprisingly big, that’s because it is.

Cars and public transit accounted for more than 120 million of all commutes, dwarfing the number of bike rides. But the number of bicyclists actually exceeded the number of people who used commuter or long-distance rail to get to work. In fact, they more than doubled the number of commuter rail users.

Of course, this isn’t exactly an apples-to-apples comparison—commuter rail goes to and from metro areas, while bicyclists tend to commute within the metro limits—but it does show that, against some other forms of transportation, bike commuting was a competitive means of travel.

Not all cities are bike-friendly. A lack of dedicated bicycle lanes combined with road systems with too many one-way streets colludes in many cities, making commuting by bike less practical than bus or train.  According to the Bike League, even walking is a more popular alternative to getting to work than riding a bike.

But this is not to say there aren’t cities where bike commuting is on the rise; quite the contrary—certainly for the 10 cities on this list.

Using data from the Bike League, the Census Bureau, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and several cities’ websites, Velotric looked into the 10 cities in the U.S. where bike commuting has increased the most. Seventy-six cities identified by the Bike League based on population and bicycle-friendliness were ranked by how much bicycle use increased between 2015 and 2020 per 10,000 people. This list focuses on commuting data: the trip from home to the workplace and vice versa.

Fewer people were commuting to workplaces in general in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but in the following cities, commuting by bicycle increased, nonetheless.

10. Cheyenne, Wyoming

– Increase in bike commuters: 13 more commuters per 10K people
– Bikers per 10K in 2020: 40
– Bikers per 10K in 2015: 27

9. Detroit, Michigan

– Increase in bike commuters: 14 more commuters per 10K people
– Bikers per 10K in 2020: 67
– Bikers per 10K in 2015: 52

8. Boise, Idaho

– Increase in bike commuters: 14 more commuters per 10K people
– Bikers per 10K in 2020: 271
– Bikers per 10K in 2015: 256

7. Wichita, Kansas

– Increase in bike commuters: 21 more commuters per 10K people
– Bikers per 10K in 2020: 43
– Bikers per 10K in 2015: 21

6. Washington D.C.

– Increase in bike commuters: 22 more commuters per 10K people
– Bikers per 10K in 2020: 422
– Bikers per 10K in 2015: 401

5. Atlanta, Georgia

– Increase in bike commuters: 27 more commuters per 10K people
– Bikers per 10K in 2020: 111
– Bikers per 10K in 2015: 84

4. New York City, New York

– Increase in bike commuters: 28 more commuters per 10K people
– Bikers per 10K in 2020: 132
– Bikers per 10K in 2015: 104

3. Boston, Massachusetts

– Increase in bike commuters: 29 more commuters per 10K people
– Bikers per 10K in 2020: 218
– Bikers per 10K in 2015: 189

2. Burlington, Vermont

– Increase in bike commuters: 53 more commuters per 10K people
– Bikers per 10K in 2020: 624
– Bikers per 10K in 2015: 570

1. Portland, Maine

– Increase in bike commuters: 54 more commuters per 10K people
– Bikers per 10K in 2020: 211
– Bikers per 10K in 2015: 157